Large Format Imaging for Libraries and Archives

When standard overhead scanners and cameras run out of pixels and lighting options, Creekside Digital can help. Using medium and large format imaging systems from Phase One and BetterLight along with the finest German large format lenses from Schneider and Rodenstock, we can image oversized maps, panoramic photographs, atlases, posters, and other large / odd-sized items, either at our Maryland studio or on-site at your institution.

Unmatched Resolution and Lighting Flexibility

Imaging an historic panoramic photograph in our Glen Arm, MD studio

Imaging an historic panoramic photograph in our Glen Arm, MD studio

With a maximum pixel count of 12,000 x 15,990 for a single image, yielding a 48-bit uncompressed, lossless TIFF master file 1.1 GB in size, our BetterLight Super8K system can capture items up to 40” x 53.3” at a full 300 pixels per inch true optical resolution, with no stitching. Moreover, its trilinear CCD sensor captures red, green, and blue color data separately – without interpolation – yielding the most accurate color reproduction available today.

Along with our Phase One and BetterLight systems, we proudly use the finest oversized copy stand ever made – the Tarsia Technical Industries 4060. Its integrated dual vacuum boards gently yet securely hold items in place for imaging, without requiring a glass or platen to flatten items – especially important if they have been stored rolled up rather than flat.

By treating large-format imaging for cultural heritage projects as the custom photography work it is rather than a push-button scanning operation, Creekside Digital truly raises the bar on image quality. Our on-staff photographers expertly light each piece to eliminate glare, shadows, and fall-off – a task often impossible for overhead scanners given their integrated lighting (and fixed angle of incidence) and reflective glass platens.

Not just for two-dimensional objects!

Because our imaging systems are based on decades-proven medium format and 4×5 view camera technology and they  don’t require items to fit into a relatively small space underneath a scanhead or flatbed lid, thye can be used to image just about anything – sculpture, artifacts, paintings and other fine artwork, tapestries, building interiors, and more. Contact us today to discuss your imaging needs.

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Just a heads up that our corporate website is currently down as we are in the process of moving into our new facilities! We're hopeful that everything will be back up by close of business tomorrow . . . stay tuned. ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Creekside Digital

The Digitization Program Office (DPO) is pleased to present its 2018 Annual Report outlining the work and special activities that took place over the course of the year.

DPO works to implement a vision of “Discovery through Digitization” by partnering with others to increase the quantity, quality, and impact of digitized Smithsonian collections.

View and download the report at:
dpo.si.edu/resources
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2 months ago

Creekside Digital

Now for some music with #smithsonianmusic! We're currently working with National Museum of American History Archives Center to digitize thousands of posters related to WWI and WWII, including this troop morale poster from 1917: collections.si.edu/search/detail/edanmdm:siris_arc_176697

According to an article from the New York Times published in the fall of 1918, the Phonograph Records Recruiting Corps was created by Vivien Burnett, son of novelist and playwright Frances Hodgson Burnett, to collect records, machines, and needles to provide music to soldiers overseas during WWI, by recruiting and drafting "slacker records."

Learn more about the Smithsonian Year of Music: music.si.edu/ and stay tuned as we continue to digitize more collections from National Museum of American History!
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