Digitizing “Back to the Future”

Digitizing the original screen-used newspaper prop from "Back to the Future"

Digitizing the original screen-used newspaper prop from “Back to the Future”

One of the best parts about working here is that we get to see cool stuff every week, and we recently completed another really neat project. Creekside Digital was selected to digitize the original screen-used Hill Valley Telegraph newspaper prop from the movie “Back to the Future” that Michael J. Fox’s character pulls out of a trash can upon his arrival in 1955 to confirm that he has indeed traveled back in time.

The original newspaper is shown here being captured on our i2S CopiBook HD600 overhead scanner. This equipment allows us to capture items up to 17″ x 25″ quickly and at a very high level of quality, and we use it to shoot quite a number of newspapers, manuscripts, scrapbooks, ledgers, photographs, and other loose and bound items. In addition to the digitization, Creekside Digital was asked to manually retouch out all of the flaws in the images such as wrinkles and yellowing. Soon, pristine reproduction copies of this prop will be available for sale, with proceeds benefiting the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research.

The paper as held by Michael J. Fox in "Back to the Future"

The paper as held by Michael J. Fox in “Back to the Future”

Latest on Facebook

3 months ago

Creekside Digital

Hey . . . that's the historic railroad depot building that's still in our parking lot, which is also the logo of our frame shop Glen Arm Custom Framing!

A Ride on the Ma & Pa through Baltimore County in PhotosAug 13, 2:00pmHistorical Society of Baltimore CountyRailroad historian Rudy Fischer will take us on a virtual ride - via slides - along the path of the old Maryland and Pennsylvania (Ma & Pa) Railroad through Baltimore County. The Ma & Pa was formed in 1901 through the consolidation of the Baltimore and Lehigh Railway and the York Southern Railroad, and connected Baltimore, Maryland, and York, Pennsylvania, until the 1950s. The Ma & Pa transported passengers, mail, marble and slate, anthracite coal, lumber, manufactured goods, and agricultural products, especially milk, along its picturesque, meandering route.

Part of our Almshouse Speaker Series. Admission $5 per person, free to HSBC members. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, please email us at info@hsobc.org or call us at 410-666-1878.
... See MoreSee Less

A Ride on the Ma & Pa through Baltimore County in Photos
Get Started