Mixed Bag

Greetings!

The Baltimore Metro Area hit a new record temperature for today’s date with a high of 105 degrees. Yes — it was miserable, and we’re all hiding in the air conditioning. No break in sight, either. But just five months ago, we literally had five feet of snow piled up in the parking lot!

As I previously mentioned, we’ve had many smaller projects going in and out of the shop. As an example, this morning we scanned a 46 year-old yearbook to searchable PDF for an individual customer in New Jersey, and also processed a small historic microfilm project for a municipal customer in New Hampshire. Both jobs came out very well. The CopiBook HD 600 is *exceedingly* sharp edge-to-edge, and it really shows. Those of you considering doing work yourselves on a $99 Best Buy flatbed scanner versus sending it to us would be shocked at the difference — it is literally apples and oranges. I hope to have some hi-res samples available on the site soon to really demonstrate the machine’s capabilities. But if you want sharp, accurate images, you will be hard-pressed to beat our CopiBook HD 600.

At the ALA show, I saw the Austrian Treventus book scanning robot being marketed here in the US by Indus. Interesting concept — pros and cons to its approach. It uses two CCD sensors embedded in its “splitting wedge”and actually line-scans both sides of each page simultaneously. It probably does the best job of eliminating page curvature of any robot out there, but it’s capped at 300dpi true optical resolution, so it won’t work for true preservation-quality work. Its maximum page size is also limited, and the price tag is a bit high (as with all robots). But it seems this unit would be a monster for rapid digitization of general circulation stacks, for example.

Case studies will be up on this site soon — Santa Paula Historical Society, and John Rigby & Co., Inc., with others to follow.

– Jim

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2 months ago

Creekside Digital

Hey . . . that's the historic railroad depot building that's still in our parking lot, which is also the logo of our frame shop Glen Arm Custom Framing!

A Ride on the Ma & Pa through Baltimore County in PhotosAug 13, 2:00pmHistorical Society of Baltimore CountyRailroad historian Rudy Fischer will take us on a virtual ride - via slides - along the path of the old Maryland and Pennsylvania (Ma & Pa) Railroad through Baltimore County. The Ma & Pa was formed in 1901 through the consolidation of the Baltimore and Lehigh Railway and the York Southern Railroad, and connected Baltimore, Maryland, and York, Pennsylvania, until the 1950s. The Ma & Pa transported passengers, mail, marble and slate, anthracite coal, lumber, manufactured goods, and agricultural products, especially milk, along its picturesque, meandering route.

Part of our Almshouse Speaker Series. Admission $5 per person, free to HSBC members. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, please email us at info@hsobc.org or call us at 410-666-1878.
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A Ride on the Ma & Pa through Baltimore County in Photos

2 months ago

Creekside Digital

#Digitization is cool (and important), but remember that it really just enables what comes next. What are the killer apps that will consume all of this unlocked cultural heritage content?How can you use library collections as data to answer questions? For example, how can computational methods help determine who wrote the Federalist Papers? medium.com/@librarycongress/collections-as-data-40422b043f5a ... See MoreSee Less

#Digitization is cool (and important), but remember that it really just enables what comes next.  What are the killer apps that will consume all of this unlocked cultural heritage content?

 

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